Decimal, binary, hex & ASCII conversion table

This is a conversion table with decimal numbers next to their binary and hex equivalents. The matching ASCII characters are listed as well, with a more elaborate descriptions of some characters on this page. If none of these words mean anything to you, jump to the bottom of this page for more information on:

 

ASCII codes 0 to 127

 

Nr Binary Hex ASCII Description
0 00000000 0h null
1 00000001 1h start of heading
2 00000010 2h start of text
3 00000011 3h end of text
4 00000100 4h end of transmission
5 00000101 5h enquiry
6 00000110 6h acknowledge
7 00000111 7h bell
8 00001000 8h backspace
9 00001001 9h horizontal tab
10 00001010 Ah line feed
11 00001011 Bh vertical tab
12 00001100 Ch form feed
13 00001101 Dh carriage return
14 00001110 Eh shift out
15 00001111 Fh shift in
16 00010000 10h data link escape
17 00010001 11h device control 1
18 00010010 12h device control 2
19 00010011 13h device control 3
20 00010100 14h device control 4
21 00010101 15h negative acknowledge
22 00010110 16h synchronous idle
23 00010111 17h end of block
24 00011000 18h cancel
25 00011001 19h end of medium
26 00011010 1Ah substitute
27 00011011 1Bh escape
28 00011100 1Ch file separator
29 00011101 1Dh group separator
30 00011110 1Eh record separator
31 00011111 1Fh unit separator
32 00100000 20h space
33 00100001 21h ! exclamation mark
34 00100010 22h double quotes
35 00100011 23h # number sign or hash tag
36 00100100 24h $ dollar sign
37 00100101 25h % percent sign
38 00100110 26h & ampersand
39 00100111 27h single quote
40 00101000 28h ( left parenthesis
41 00101001 29h ) right parenthesis
42 00101010 2Ah * asterisk
43 00101011 2Bh + plus sign
44 00101100 2Ch , comma
45 00101101 2Dh hyphen or minus sign
46 00101110 2Eh . period
47 00101111 2Fh / slash
48 00110000 30h 0 zero
49 00110001 31h 1 one
50 00110010 32h 2 two
51 00110011 33h 3 three
52 00110100 34h 4 four
53 00110101 35h 5 five
54 00110110 36h 6 six
55 00110111 37h 7 seven
56 00111000 38h 8 eight
57 00111001 39h 9 nine
58 00111010 3Ah : colon
59 00111011 3Bh ; semicolon/td>
60 00111100 3Ch < less than sign
61 00111101 3Dh = equal sign
62 00111110 3Eh > greater than sign
63 00111111 3Fh ? question mark
64 01000000 40h @ at symbol
65 01000001 41h A capital a
66 01000010 42h B capital b
67 01000011 43h C capital c
68 01000100 44h D capital d
69 01000101 45h E capital e
70 01000110 46h F capital f
71 01000111 47h G capital g
72 01001000 48h H capital h
73 01001001 49h I capital i
74 01001010 4Ah J capital j
75 01001011 4Bh K capital k
76 01001100 4Ch L capital l
77 01001101 4Dh M capital m
78 01001110 4Eh N capital n
79 01001111 4Fh O capital o
80 01010000 50h P capital p
81 01010001 51h Q capital q
82 01010010 52h R capital r
83 01010011 53h S capital s
84 01010100 54h T capital t
85 01010101 55h U capital u
86 01010110 56h V capital v
87 01010111 57h W capital w
88 01011000 58h X capital x
89 01011001 59h Y capital y
90 01011010 5Ah Z capital z
91 01011011 5Bh [ left bracket
92 01011100 5Ch \ backslash
93 01011101 5Dh ] right bracket
94 01011110 5Eh ^ caret or circumflex
95 01011111 5Fh _ underscore
96 01100000 60h ` grave accent
97 01100001 61h a lowercase a
98 01100010 62h b lowercase b
99 01100011 63h c lowercase c
100 01100100 64h d lowercase d
101 01100101 65h e lowercase e
102 01100110 66h f lowercase f
103 01100111 67h g lowercase g
104 01101000 68h h lowercase h
105 01101001 69h i lowercase i
106 01101010 6Ah j lowercase j
107 01101011 6Bh k lowercase k
108 01101100 6Ch l lowercase l
109 01101101 6Dh m lowercase m
110 01101110 6Eh n lowercase n
111 01101111 6Fh o lowercase o
112 01110000 70h p lowercase p
113 01110001 71h q lowercase q
114 01110010 72h r lowercase r
115 01110011 73h s lowercase s
116 01110100 74h t lowercase t
117 01110101 75h u lowercase u
118 01110110 76h v lowercase v
119 01110111 77h w lowercase w
120 01111000 78h x lowercase x
121 01111001 79h y lowercase y
122 01111010 7Ah z lowercase z
123 01111011 7Bh { left brace
124 01111100 7Ch | bar
125 01111101 7Dh } right brace
126 01111110 7Eh ~ tilde or equivalency sign
127 01111111 7Fh DEL

 

Extended ASCII codes

Below are the extended ASCII codes for character codes 128 to 255. This table uses the ISO 8859-1 or ISO Latin-1 encoding. Codes 128-159 contain the Microsoft Windows Latin-1 extended characters. Other variations exist but this is the most commonly used set of character codes.

Nr Binary Hex ASCII Description
128 10000000 80h euro sign
129 10000001 81h
130 10000010 82h single low-9 quotation mark
131 10000011 83h ƒ lowercase f with hook
132 10000100 84h double low-9 quotation mark
133 10000101 85h horizontal ellipsis
134 10000110 86h dagger
135 10000111 87h double dagger
136 10001000 88h ˆ circumflex accent
137 10001001 89h per mille sign
138 10001010 8Ah Š uppercase s with caron
139 10001011 8Bh single left-pointing angle quotation
140 10001100 8Ch ΠOE ligature
141 10001101 8Dh
142 10001110 8Eh Ž uppercase z with caron
143 10001111 8Fh
144 10010000 90h
145 10010001 91h left single quotation mark
146 10010010 92h right single quotation mark
147 10010011 93h left double quotation mark
148 10010100 94h right double quotation mark
149 10010101 95h bullet
150 10010110 96h en dash
151 10010111 97h em dash
152 10011000 98h ˜ small tilde
153 10011001 99h trade mark sign
154 10011010 9Ah š lowercase s with caron
155 10011011 9Bh Single right-pointing angle quotation mark
156 10011100 9Ch œ lowercase oe ligature
157 10011101 9Dh
158 10011110 9Eh ž lowercase z with caron
159 10011111 9Fh Ÿ capital y with diaeresis
160 10100000 A0h non-breaking space
161 10100001 A1h ¡ inverted exclamation mark
162 10100010 A2h ¢ cent sign
163 10100011 A3h £ pound sign
164 10100100 A4h ¤ currency sign
165 10100101 A5h ¥ yen sign
166 10100110 A6h ¦ broken vertical bar
167 10100111 A7h § section sign
168 10101000 A8h ¨ umlaut
169 10101001 A9h © copyright sign
170 10101010 AAh ª feminine ordinal indicator
171 10101011 ABh « left double angle quotes
172 10101100 ACh ¬ not sign
173 10101101 ADh ­ soft hyphen
174 10101110 AEh ® registered trademark sign
175 10101111 AFh ¯ overline
176 10110000 B0h ° degree sign
177 10110001 B1h ± plus-or-minus sign
178 10110010 B2h ² 2 cubed
179 10110011 B3h ³ 3 cubed
180 10110100 B4h ´ acute accent
181 10110101 B5h µ micro sign
182 10110110 B6h pilcrow sign
183 10110111 B7h · middle dot
184 10111000 B8h ¸ cedilla
185 10111001 B9h ¹ superscript one
186 10111010 BAh º masculine ordinal indicator
187 10111011 BBh » right double angle quotes
188 10111100 BCh ¼ fraction one quarter
189 10111101 BDh ½ fraction one-half
190 10111110 BEh ¾ fraction three-quarters
191 10111111 BFh ¿ inverted question mark
192 11000000 C0h À capital a with grave
193 11000001 C1h Á capital a with acute
194 11000010 C2h  capital a with circumflex
195 11000011 C3h à capital a with tilde
196 11000100 C4h Ä capital a with diaeresis
197 11000101 C5h Å capital a with ring above
198 11000110 C6h Æ capital AE
199 11000111 C7h Ç capital c with cedilla
200 11001000 C8h È capital e with grave
201 11001001 C9h É capital e with acute
202 11001010 CAh Ê capital e with circumflex
203 11001011 CBh Ë capital e with diaeresis
204 11001100 CCh Ì capital i with grave
205 11001101 CDh Í capital i with acute
206 11001110 CEh Î capital i with circumflex
207 11001111 CFh Ï capital i with diaeresis
208 11010000 D0h Ð capital eth
209 11010001 D1h Ñ capital n with circumflex
210 11010010 D2h Ò capital o with circumflex
211 11010011 D3h Ó capital o with acute/td>
212 11010100 D4h Ô capital o with circumflex
213 11010101 D5h Õ capital o with tilde
214 11010110 D6h Ö capital o with diaeresis
215 11010111 D7h × multiplication sign
216 11011000 D8h Ø capital o with slash
217 11011001 D9h Ù capital u with grave
218 11011010 DAh Ú capital u with acute
219 11011011 DBh Û capital u with circumflex
220 11011100 DCh Ü capital u with diaeresis
221 11011101 DDh Ý capital y with acute
222 11011110 DEh Þ capital thorn
223 11011111 DFh ß lowercase ess-zed
224 11100000 E0h à lowercase a with grave
225 11100001 E1h á lowercase a with acute
226 11100010 E2h â lowercase a with circumflex
227 11100011 E3h ã lowercase a with tilde
228 11100100 E4h ä lowercase a with diaeresis
229 11100101 E5h å lowercase a with ring above
230 11100110 E6h æ lowercase ae
231 11100111 E7h ç lowercase c with cedilla
232 11101000 E8h è lowercase e with grave
233 11101001 E9h é lowercase e with acute
234 11101010 EAh ê lowercase e with circumflex
235 11101011 EBh ë lowercase e with diaeresis
236 11101100 ECh ì lowercase e with grave
237 11101101 EDh í lowercase i with acute
238 11101110 EEh î lowercase i with circumflex
239 11101111 EFh ï lowercase i with diaeresis
240 11110000 F0h ð lowercase eth
241 11110001 F1h ñ lowercase n with tilde
242 11110010 F2h ò lowercase o with grave
243 11110011 F3h ó lowercase o with acute
244 11110100 F4h ô lowercase o with circumflex
245 11110101 F5h õ lowercase o with tilde
246 11110110 F6h ö lowercase o with diaeresis
247 11110111 F7h ÷ division sign
248 11111000 F8h ø lowercase o with slash
249 11111001 F9h ù lowercase u with grave
250 11111010 FAh ú lowercase u with acute
251 11111011 FBh û lowercase u with circumflex
252 11111100 FCh ü lowercase u with diaeresis
253 11111101 FDh ý lowercase y with acute
254 11111110 FEh þ lowercase thorn
255 11111111 FFh ÿ lowercase y with diaeresis

 

Binary numbers

A computer number system that consists of 2 numerals, 0 and 1. It is sometimes called base-2.
Since computers do not have 10 fingers, all the counting within the computer itself is done using only 2 numerals: 0 and 1 (or “on” and “off” or “false” and “true”).

Hexadecimal numbers

The hexadecimal system (hex for short) uses numbers from 0 to 15. It starts off like the decimal system: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 but then comes A which equals 10 and then B, C, D, E and F (which of course equals 15). The next number is 10 which is actually 16 in decimal and so on….
Because it can be impossible to distinguish between a hex and a decimal number (is that ’25’ a decimal 25 or is it 25 in hex which equals 37 decimal?) it is customary to put a lowercase ‘h’ after each hex number. So 25 is a decimal number and 25h is a hex one.

ASCII

ASCII stands for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. It is a standard that was defined in 1965 to allow computers to exchange information, regardless of the manufacturer.

  • Since computers basically work numbers based, the ASCII character set consists of 128 decimal numbers, ranging from 0 through 127, assigned to letters, numbers, punctuation marks and the most common special characters. Since a computer needs 7 bits to represent the numbers 0 to 127, these codes are sometimes referred to as 7-bit ASCII.
    • Numbers 0 to 31 are used for control codes – special instructions such as indicating that the computer should make a sound (ASCII code 7) or the printer should start from a new sheet of paper (ASCII code 12).
    • ASCII codes 32 to 47 are used for special characters, starting with the space.
    • After the numbers 0 to 9 (ASCII codes 48 to 57) you once again get some special characters, from the colon to the @ symbol.
    • The letters start with the capital A from ASCII code 65 onwards. The lowercase a to z characters take up ASCII codes 97 to 122. You may wonder why the lowercase characters don’t simply follow their capital brethren. Remember: this is ASCII, this is computer stuff from the dark ages. If you take a capital U, which is ASCII code 85, and add 32 to that code, you get character code 117, which is the lowercase u. 32 is the magic ‘distance’ between any upper and lower case character and 32 is a truly magical, efficient number that any computer or nerd can relate to. Even I love 32.
    • Codes 123 to 127 are once again special characters, including the tilde (~).
  • All computer systems also use numbers 128 through 255 to represent additional characters, but this list is not really universally standardized. That is why the above table is split up in two parts. The first table with the 7-bit ASCII codes is universal across all computers . The second extended ASCII table is not – it is what current Windows machines use.
  • Because 256 characters are not sufficient to represent all characters used in Asian languages and to solve the annoying compatibility problems with different codes being used for codes 128 to 255, a new standard has emerged. The Unicode character set contains more than 32000 characters.
22 November 2015

16 responses to “Decimal, binary, hex & ASCII conversion table”

  1. marayah says:

    Thank you so much,it was really helpful.xxx

  2. adan says:

    thank you that was so helpful…..

  3. Robin says:

    The Commodore-64 fully utilized the ascii characters beyond 128 dec with on board keyboard keys with symbols of block shaping and different iner-shapes to be used for programing grphic design in basic comouter language. Also giving it the ability to form different letter shapes for other language scripts. Using basic OS you could use it in any country. Also fat-tracking was designed so the 1541 drive was able to deliver units of 12bit information chuncks making the drive run hot and constant when ‘disc active’games arrived. So it seems fair to say I am right when I say few people know or are aware that there was a beast of a computer that made all others look hack, sad and incompetent. Apple and IBM constructs and programming was second rate. All inginuity came from enthusiasts not money hungry cluelessness. Apple was a lot but so much less because us computer heads were running the show.
    Thanx for the table and try and talk to a c-64 owner and listen to what they say.

  4. Jesús Antonio says:

    El número 7 en sistema binario es igual a 111, ya que 7 dividido entre 2 es igual a 3, y sobra 1; después la mitad de 3 es 1 entre dos es 1; después 1 entre 2 es igual a 1. Finalmente los residuos son 111, siendo éste el resultado que es igual a 111.

  5. monnaliza says:

    please tell me how we canfind binary 7 screm in code a to z lowerand upper case

  6. mike says:

    There are online tools like the one in this reply that can do the trick…
    http://www.online-toolz.com/

  7. Squid says:

    I need to know how to convert, The ASCII CODE, to print out a Descriptive message.
    10001000 1000101 1001100 1010000

  8. babar says:

    plz tell to me the procedure that how i can make table of binry no. system.

    thx
    regards,
    joseph

  9. Michael Long says:

    definition of a} HISH-DOOD(4004)=their brains are in the dark,their blind in one eye and no life in the other,till the fire is their face.[if your going to operate,why not operate in the realm of absolute reality.]

  10. Oscar says:

    Thanks a lot that helped me so much. Now I can show my friends.

  11. henry says:

    muy buena información

  12. manisha says:

    truly,it does helps!!

  13. gerard says:

    01000001011101000110111101101110011101000110000101110100
    translate to spanish please thanks

  14. davitz38 says:

    quite helpful, try to convert using this binary to hex online tool!
    David

  15. Melva says:

    thanks a lot! subject recaps the leason learned

  16. brigge says:

    weee.. thanks a lot! it really helps..!



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