Frutiger

Frutiger is a font family which includes serif, sans serif as well as ornamental typefaces. Its clean look made me add it to my list of interesting fonts.

What does Frutiger look like?

The text below is set in Frutiger Neue, the reworked version introduced in 2000.
Frutiger typeface example
These are some of the variants that are available.

Frutiger 45 Light

Frutiger 45 Light

Frutiger 55 Roman

Frutiger 55 Roman

Frutiger 56 Italic

Frutiger 56 Italic

Frutiger 65 Bold

Frutiger 65 Bold

Frutiger 75 Black

Frutiger 75 Black

Frutiger 95 Ultra Black

Frutiger 95 Ultra Black

What do you use Frutiger for?

The availability of many variants and weights, as well as its excellent legibility, make Frutiger a very versatile font. It can be used for anything that needs a distinct and clean or modern look. Keep in mind that Frutiger is one of Linotype’s best selling fonts: it is not exactly an exclusive font.
As an alternative, try Thesis Sans, Myriad, Segoe UI or the Bitstream version of Frutiger which is called Humanist 777.

The history of Frutiger

Adrian Frutiger designed a sans-serif typeface called Roissy around 1968. It was named after the location of the Charles De Gaulle airport where this font was used for all signage. The font family was publicly released as Frutiger in 1976. Over the years it was extended quite a lot and now includes a serif version (Frutiger Serif), variants for signage (including ASTRA-Frutiger) as well as some casual versions (Frutiger Capitalis & Frutiger Stones). Frutiger Next is a revised version from 2000 which includes true italics. In 2009 Akira Kobayashi and Adrian Frutiger once again reworked the typeface. The new version is called Neue Frutiger.

Frutiger trivia

Adrian Frutiger doesn’t seem to be too happy that Myriad, which was included in some versions of the Adobe Creative Suite, resembles his own typeface so much. You can read an interesting thread on this at Typophile.

Other sources of information

Linotype has a page which shows all the available versions of Frutiger. There is of course also a Wikipedia page

< EurostileFutura >

20 May 2017

One response to “Frutiger”

  1. christian says:

    At last someone not perpetuating the myth that Frutiger was the font used at Charles De Gaulle airport.

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